Nutrient Disorder Photos

High pH
Click for a larger image. This bacopa plant is iron deficient due to high substrate pH. Notice the interveinal chlorosis of the upper growth. Another common cause of iron deficiency is overwatering. (Photo: Brian E. Whipker)
Click for a larger image. This calibrachoa is iron deficient due to high substrate pH. Notice the yellow to white coloration of the upper growth. Growers could lower pH by acid injection, or by applying iron sulfate. (Photo: Brian E. Whipker)
Click for a larger image. High alkaline water (commonly found in the Midwest) causes water pH to increase. High pH causes iron deficiency that is identified by upper leaf chlorosis (usually interveinal). (Photo: Brian E. Whipker)
Click for a larger image. This photo shows iron deficiency in a crop of oregano due to high pH. (Photo: Brian E. Whipker)
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This photo shows iron deficiency in a pansy crop due to high pH. (Photo: Brian E. Whipker)

Click for a larger image. This photo shows iron deficiency in a petunia crop due to high pH. (Photo: Brian E. Whipker)
Click for a larger image. This photo shows iron deficiency in a poinsettia crop due to high pH. (Photo: Todd Cavins)
Click for a larger image. High pH is the culprit with these snapdragons. Normally iron deficiency is expressed in high pH conditions. (Photo: Brian E. Whipker)
Click for a larger image. Vinca plants are expressing an iron deficiency with the young leaves going uniformly chlorotic. (Photo: Brian E. Whipker)
Low pH
Click for a larger image. The bronze speckling seen on these hollyhock leaves are typical low pH symptoms. Generally, yellow, bronze, or black specks progress to necrotic lower leaves depending on species. Apply flowable lime to increase the pH immediately. (Photo: Brian E. Whipker)
Low EC
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This basil plant is rootbound and suffering from too small of a container and lack of nitrogen. (Photo: Brian E. Whipker)

Click for a larger image. This impatiens is suffering from low EC. Notice the overall unhealthy appearance. Apply nitrogen at a rate of 150-250 ppm to correct this situation. (Photo: Brian E. Whipker)
Click for a larger image. This pentas has outgrown its container and the nutrient demands are no longer being met. The lower leaf chlorosis is evident of nitrogen deficiency. (Photo: Brian E. Whipker)
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Lower leaf yellowing can occur when attempting to intensify center color by withholding fertilizer. (Photo: Brian E. Whipker)

Click for a larger image. Applying 50 to 100 ppm nitrogen is recommended during coloration development, otherwise nutrient deficiencies can occur. (Photo: Brian E. Whipker)
Click for a larger image. Lower leaf loss in a crop of ornamental cabbage at the optimum market stage. (Photo: Brian E. Whipker)
Click for a larger image. Lower leaf yellowing is the common symptom of nitrogen deficiency in the heavy nutrient requiring poinsettia. (Photo: Brian E. Whipker)
Nitrogen Deficiency
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There is a point of no return…and this is what it looks like. Granted the magnesium and nitrogen deficiencies could be turned around in a couple of weeks. However, there has already been significant lower leaf death and drop; not to mention the aphids and likelihood of Botrytis developing on the spent flower buds. (Photo: Brian E. Whipker)
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Granted New Guinea impatiens are light feeders, but when they become established in containers maintaining an adequate fertilizer charge in the substrate is crucial. (Photo: Brian E. Whipker)

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Granted New Guinea impatiens are light feeders, but when they become established in containers maintaining an adequate fertilizer charge in the substrate is crucial. (Photo: Brian E. Whipker)

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This poinsettia has been subjected to poor fertilization practices during production. Recovery is not an option, because nutrient uptake is too slow in the post-production stage. (Photo: Brian E. Whipker)
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This plant has a low substrate EC. Fertilization is generally reduced or discontinued when bracts begin to color up. Unfortunately the fertilization was terminated too early. (Photo: Brian E. Whipker)
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Tomato transplants can become deficient when clear water is applied to control height. The best management strategy is to remove flats out of the greenhouse as roots reach the sides of the container then apply low rates of nitrogen (50 to 100 ppm N) on the outside retail bench. (Photo: Brian E. Whipker)
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This vinca is expressing a severe nitrogen deficiency. The lowest leaves are completely chlorotic. A marginal necrotic burn is also observed. (Photo: Todd Cavins)
Phosphorus Deficiency
Click for a larger image. Foliar purpling is the common symptom of phosphorus deficiency in tomato. (Photo: Brian E. Whipker)
Magnesium Deficiency
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A slight yellowing between the veins on the lower leaves is an initial symptom of magnesium deficiency. Using 1 to 2 lbs. of epsom salts (MgSO4) is recommended as corrective procedure. (Photo: Brian E. Whipker)

Click for a larger image. This poinsettia is exhibiting advanced magnesium deficiency. Notice the interveinal chlorosis that has progressed to necrosis. (Photo: James L. Gibson)
Click for a larger image. Several crops have high requirements for specific nutrients. This gerbera is suffering from magnesium deficiency (lower leaf interveinal chlorosis). Generally, additional applications of epsom salts (MgSO4) during production can alleviate problems during retail marketing. (Photo: Brian E. Whipker)
Click for a larger image. Irrigation water quality influences plant nutrition. In the southeastern U.S., groundwater tends to have low levels of calcium, magnesium, and carbonates. This geranium produced in North Carolina was not provided with supplemental magnesium (lower leaf interveinal chlorosis is a typical magnesium deficiency symptom). (Photo: Brian E. Whipker)
Click for a larger image. These two magnesium deficient leaves were removed from lower part of geranium plants. Notice the initial (left) versus advanced (right) interveinal chlorosis. Using 1 to 2 lbs. of epsom salts (MgSO4) per 100 gallons is recommended as corrective procedure. (Photo: Brian E. Whipker)
Iron Deficiency
Click for a larger image. Similar to magnesium deficiency, iron deficiency is expressed as interveinal chlorosis. Notice the top (or new growth) is affected, this indicates iron deficiency versus magnesium, which would be expressed on the lower leaves. Too high substrate pH is a common cause of iron deficiency. (Photo: James L. Gibson)

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