Winter Annual Photos

Early spring vegetatively propagated annuals
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The vegetatively propagated diascia can withstand the cool temperatures of early spring. (Photo: Lane Greer)

Click for a larger image. Calibrachoa is quite hardy and should be grown as a late winter/early spring crop. (Photo: Lane Greer)
Click for a larger image. This container combines calibrachoa, nemesia, and osteospermum to make an effective "spring fever" garden. (Photo: Lane Greer)
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Despite its tender appearance, nemesia is an example of a perfect early spring plant. (Photo: Lane Greer)

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Osteospermum blooms from early spring to early summer. (Photo: James L. Gibson)

Click for a larger image. Osteospermum performs very well on the Pacific coast. (Photo: Todd J. Cavins)
Click for a larger image. The 'Symphony' series of osteospermum provides vibrant colors as well as warm-season tolerance. (Photo: Lane Greer)
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The 'Symphony' series of osteospermum provides vibrant colors as well as warm-season tolerance. (Photo: James L. Gibson)

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Several vegetatively propagated verbenas have outstanding winter hardiness. (Photo: James L. Gibson)

Click for a larger image. Argyranthemum performs well in spring and fall, producing daisy-like flowers over the entire plant. (Photo: James L. Gibson)

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