Display Garden Photos

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This display garden has it all: hardscaping, trees, shrubs, perennials, annuals, water, and whimsical art. (Photo: James L. Gibson)

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Annuals add interest to display gardens. Grassy strips provide a soft walkway through the garden. (Photo: James L. Gibson)

Click for a larger image. Once vines become well-established fixtures in the garden, the arbor becomes a living structure. (Photo: James L. Gibson)
Click for a larger image. Statuary accents plant material and supports the theme of the garden. (Photo: James L. Gibson)
Click for a larger image. These detailed ornaments welcome birds to the display garden. (Photo: James L. Gibson)
Click for a larger image. Statuary is an important feature in display gardens. (Photo: James L. Gibson)
Click for a larger image. Wooden bridge in a display garden at Homewood Nursery, Raleigh, NC. The "bricks" are actually roofing tiles nailed onto wooden planks. (Photo: Todd J. Cavins)
Click for a larger image. Border perennial bed in Fayetteville, AR in early spring. Paths in a display garden allow the customer to get closer to plants. (Photo: Lane Greer)
Click for a larger image. This scene shows the retailer's desire to extend the shopping experience by providing seating for tag-along shoppers. (Photo: Brian E. Whipker)
Click for a larger image. Evergreens serve as a background for statuary at Fairview Nursery, Raleigh, NC. (Photo: James L. Gibson)
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Perennial border at Monticello, Charlottesville, VA. Heirloom plants were used to recreate the gardens as they appeared in Thomas Jefferson's time. (Photo: Lane Greer)

Click for a larger image. Signs should be placed effectively so that they direct potential customers to the display garden before entering the sales area. (Photo: James L. Gibson)
Click for a larger image. Rock cascade for dry stream bed in a display garden at Homewood Nursery, Raleigh, NC. It is important to establish the foundation structures before plant installation. (Photo: Todd J. Cavins)
Click for a larger image. Pond and pathway in a display garden at Homewood Nursery, Raleigh, NC. Water gardens offer unique environments for plants and animals. (Photo: Todd J. Cavins)
Click for a larger image. Use icons to tie into sales of associated plants. This metal dragon structure is fun in a display garden and is perfect for advertising 'Dragon Wing' begonias. (Photo: Todd J. Cavins)
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This colorful display, located at the entrance of the garden center, attracts passers-by. (Photo: James L. Gibson)

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Signs should be placed effectively so that they direct potential customers to the display garden before entering the sales area. (Photo: James L. Gibson)

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Don't forget that container gardens can also serve as display gardens. (Photo: James L. Gibson)

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Small display gardens offer abundant color but require less maintenance. (Photo: Brian E. Whipker)

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This clearly defined entranceway is a portal to the garden. (Photo: Brian E. Whipker)

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A small display garden is the right way to start. This herb garden uses several elements present in a good display garden: woody plants, hard goods, and perennial and annual herbs. (Photo: Brian E. Whipker)

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This herb garden is made more formal with the addition of statuary. (Photo: James L. Gibson)

Click for a larger image. Display gardens should be prominently marked. This structure welcomes potential customers. (Photo: James L. Gibson)
Click for a larger image. Island bed in Fayetteville, AR. Perennials, shrubs, and small trees complement each other in this driveway bed, focusing on summer color. (Photo: Lane Greer)
Click for a larger image. Space constraints can lead to unique uses of common fixtures. (Photo: James L. Gibson)
Click for a larger image. Benches in the display garden should be practical and inviting. (Photo: James L. Gibson)
Click for a larger image. A display garden surrounding the restrooms at the J.C. Raulston Arboretum, Raleigh, NC. (Photo: James L. Gibson)
Click for a larger image. A panoramic view of the display garden at Fairview Nursery, Raleigh, NC. This garden incorporates a balance of hard and soft goods. (Photo: James L. Gibson)
Click for a larger image. A panoramic view of the display garden at Fairview Nursery, Raleigh, NC. This garden incorporates a balance of hard and soft goods. (Photo: James L. Gibson)

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A row of evergreens is a good backdrop for any display garden. Shrubs and trees should be planted early in the life of a display garden. (Photo: James L. Gibson)
Click for a larger image. Campbell Road Nursery in Raleigh, NC, placed a colorful annual display garden beside their rustic retail building. (Photo: James L. Gibson)
Click for a larger image. Bulb garden in Fayetteville, AR. Use of evergreen shrubs provides a background for the dormant summer garden. (Photo: Lane Greer)
Click for a larger image. Bridges allow customers to travel over water and rugged areas in the display garden. (Photo: James L. Gibson)
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Small display gardens are easy to maintain in winter. (Photo: James L. Gibson)

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