INSPECTING YOUR HOME FOR TERMITES - EXTERIOR

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Exterior inspections are important, particularly for houses built on slabs. They may provide your only chance to catch termites before they invade your home. Here's a checklist of to guide you in your inspection.
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Check the exterior foundation for mud tubes. This is particularly important for houses built on slabs, since this is one of the few inspectable areas. exterior
Siding should be at least 6 inches above grade (the soil level) so that you can inspect the foundation for termite tubes. siding
Foamboard on the foundation can hide termite activity. foamboard
Look for cracks in the foundation. Termites can use any gap of only 1/32 inch to gain entry into your home. cracks
Check for areas where the siding appears to be "blistered", particularly where siding touches steps or a porch. These areas are prone to termite and decay problems.
step
Areas beneath roof overhangs, particularly where there are no roof gutters may be subject to moisture problems.
Decks can hide termite tubes or damage to siding. Inspections of areas under decks are critical. Decks
Inspect porch columns and rail supports porch
Look for untreated wood in direct contact with soil. porch
Check door frames, particularly around garage doors, for moisture or termite damage. Doorframe
Check window frames for soft/decaying wood. Moist wood is vulnerable to termite attack. Windowframe
Water damage to roof areas can create conditions that may lead to a secondary or above-ground termite infestation that is not detectable in a regular inspection. Fascia
Landscape timbers, even pressure-treated timbers, may decay and be attacked by termites over time. Flower boxes attached to the house may provide termites with access to the house without being seen. . timber


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